October 12, 2017

Although virtually all of the water gets used, any extra is released so that it replenishes the aquifer beneath the valley floor. Every drop of water is precious in Death Valley, Calif. Averaging less than two inches of rain a year, the valley is the driest spot in North America. There were even two years, 1929 and 1953, when no rain fell at all. During a stay at The Oasis at Death Valley (formerly called the Furnace Creek Resort), you…

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September 28, 2017

As destination weddings continue to surge in popularity, couples are increasingly looking for novel places to get hitched. According to a 2016 study by The Knot, a wedding news and planning website, destination weddings make up roughly 20 percent of all nuptials. Las Vegas, of course, remains a popular spot for saying “I do.” But for a truly one-of-a-kind celebration, skip the Elvis impersonators and slot machines, and say your vows at The Oasis at Death Valley (formerly known as…

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September 27, 2017

This is Where Phil Mickelson Got His First Set of Left-Handed Golf Clubs; It Was a Girls Set – That’s the Only Set They Had. The t-shirt in the pro-shop features a skeleton playing golf. On the first tee, whirligigs of the Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote spin in a never-ending chase at minus 214 feet below sea level on what once was an ancient seabed. Welcome to Furnace Creek Golf Course, an 18-hole course located in a true…

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August 04, 2017

While today’s Death Valley National Park visitors venture to this remote region to marvel at the stark desert beauty and to escape into the silence of the park’s vast expanses, for well over a century prospectors and miners came here in search of treasure. There was, quite literally, gold in them thar hills (as well as silver). But ultimately it was less glamorous, non-metallic minerals, such as borax and talc, that proved the most profitable. As Richard E. Lingenfelter wrote…

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July 07, 2017

When you visit the ghost towns in and around Death Valley National Park, you’ll see little more than the foundations and crumbling walls of buildings constructed more than a century ago. So don't expect the staged gunfights and cool sarsaparillas of more tourist-oriented ghost towns. Get ready to use your imagination to bring these communities to life. Some of Death Valley’s ghost towns were once communities with hundreds — even thousands — of residents who were drawn to this foreboding…

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June 04, 2017

It’s all about the geology in Death Valley National Park. You don’t come to this sprawling desert park for mountain meadows and waves crashing against the shoreline. There are no towering sequoia trees and, except for the occasional flash flood, rushing rivers are in decidedly short supply. But if lacking many of the attractions that visitors commonly associate with more traditional national parks, the very absence of dense forests and thick vegetation leaves the bones of the earth exposed in…

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May 08, 2017

It was William Shakespeare, of course, who concluded, “What’s in a name? That which we call a rose/By any other name would smell as sweet.” But in the case of Death Valley, with apologies to Shakespeare, there’s little question that its imposing moniker enhances the legend of a place already notorious for the hottest temperature ever recorded anywhere in the world and as the driest location in North America. As Richard E. Lingenfelter wrote in his magisterial history, Death Valley…

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April 06, 2017

Justly famous for its weather extremes, Death Valley National Park hardly seems like a hospitable place for wildlife. A 134˚ F reading in July 1913 earned the valley the dubious honor of the hottest place on Earth, and, with average annual precipitation less than two inches, it’s also considered the driest spot in North America. No rain fell at all in 1929 and 1953. Yet Death Valley is anything but lifeless. From autumn into spring, the weather is positively heavenly.…

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March 02, 2017

The largest national park outside Alaska, Death Valley National Park in California spreads over 5,000 square miles of desert and mountains. That’s a lot of ground to cover. But during a stay at Furnace Creek Resort — with its AAA Four Diamond Inn at Furnace Creek Inn and family-friendly Ranch at Furnace Creek — you can have a perfect day filled with history and adventure without ever straying from the Furnace Creek area. Morning Learn About the Valley Many people…

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February 02, 2017

Plunging canyons, remote dunes, and dramatic landscapes await visitors While you can easily explore Death Valley National Park from its main roads, a world of rugged canyons, remote dunes, and awe-inspiring landscapes awaits visitors who go off-pavement to tour the park’s backroads. Within easy reach of Furnace Creek Resort, these roads — some just a few miles long, others all-day adventures — lead to hidden spots that most park visitors miss. The routes listed here are all rated as suitable…

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